You Ask — We Answer

COMMON QUESTIONS

WHAT WILL MY FIRST VISIT BE LIKE?

First off, thank you for choosing our office for all your dental needs. We have created a comfortable environment where you can feel confident in the level of dental care you receive. When you arrive for your first visit, please be prepared to complete all insurance and health information forms that will allow us to begin your dental treatment. We will ask you to fill out several forms that will get you acquainted with our office.

Your initial exam will last approximately one hour. This visit will help us get acquainted with each other and learn about your goals and desires for your dental treatment. Generally, X-rays will be taken allowing your doctor to examine the jaw’s structure, teeth position and teeth decay. Oral hygiene instructions will also be provided along with suggestions to help you care for your teeth. In most cases, we will also clean your teeth on this visit and provide an evaluation that will outline your existing dental problems and proposed treatment.

We believe that good dental care begins with open communication. We promise to speak candidly with you about any symptoms present that may require further dental treatment, our diagnosis, alternative treatments that may exist, and our recommendations. Working together, we can achieve a true partnership, with one common goal-keeping your smile beautiful and your teeth, gums and jaw joints healthy!

WHAT INSURANCE IS ACCEPTED AT RAPHAELSON DENTAL ASSOCIATES

We are a preferred provider for all major PPO dental insurance plans. Additionally, we will submit all insurance claims for you. We will fully attempt to help you receive full insurance benefits; however, you are personally responsible for your account, and we encourage you to contact us if your policy has not paid within 30 days. Your treatment plan will include a breakdown of all applicable fees, and we will inform you of all costs before treatment is administered. For your convenience, we accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express credit cards. We also offer 0% interest in-house financing that allows you to spread payments over four months. Senior citizen discounts are also available to help make your treatment more affordable.

Please ask a member of our staff, and we will review our payment options to accommodate your financial needs.

If special arrangements are needed, please talk to our office manager prior to receiving service.

ARE PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE FOR MY DENTAL TREATMENT?

Yes. We accept many types of dental insurance and will process your claim for you upon receipt of your co-payment. We offer a zero interest rate payment plan and also accept most major credit cards, including MasterCard and Visa.

WHAT IF I HAVE AN EMERGENCY?

Please call our office as soon as you determine that you have a dental emergency. We will be glad to work you in to our schedule if you have a dental emergency during regular business hours. After hours, over the weekend and during holidays, please call our office for the doctor’s emergency contact number.

Common Emergencies Include:
Tooth Ache
Begin by cleaning around the sore tooth meticulously. Using warm salt water, rinse the mouth to displace any food trapped between teeth. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should you use aspirin on the aching tooth or on the gum. In the event of facial swelling, apply a cold compress to the area. For temporary pain relief, acetaminophen is recommended. See a dentist as soon as possible.

Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip or Cheek
Ice can be applied to any bruised areas. For bleeding, apply firm (but gentle) pressure with sterile gauze or a clean cloth. If the bleeding does not stop with pressure or continues after 15 minutes, go to an emergency room.

Broken Braces and Wires
Remove a broken appliance only if it comes out easily. If it is lodged or painful to remove, cover any protruding edges with wax, cotton balls, gauze or chewing gum. DO NOT REMOVE any wire caught in the gums, cheek or tongue; see a dentist immediately. Emergency attention is usually not required for loose or broken appliances that cause no discomfort.

Broken Tooth
Rinse the area with warm water. Put a cold compress over the facial area of the injury. Recover any broken tooth fragments. Get immediate dental attention.

Knocked Out Permanent Tooth
Recover the tooth, making sure to hold it by the crown (top) and not the root end. Rinse, but do not clean or handle the tooth more than necessary. Reinsert the tooth in the socket and hold it in place using a clean piece of gauze or cloth. If the tooth cannot be reinserted, carry it in a cup containing milk or water. Because time is essential, see a dentist immediately.

Other Emergency Conditions:
Possible Broken Jaw
In the event of jaw injury, tie the mouth closed with a towel, tie or handkerchief. Go immediately to an emergency room.

Bleeding After a Baby Tooth Falls Out
Fold a piece of gauze and place it (tightly) over the bleeding area. Bite down on the gauze for 15 minutes; if bleeding continues, see a dentist.

Cold or Canker Sores
Over-the-counter medications will usually provide temporary relief. If sores persist, visit your dentist.

WHAT ARE COMMON DENTAL PROBLEMS?

Tooth Decay
Caries, or tooth decay, is a preventable disease. While caries might not endanger your life, they may negatively impact your quality of life.

When your teeth and gums are consistently exposed to large amounts of starches and sugars, acids may form that begin to eat away at tooth enamel. Carbohydrate-rich foods such as candy, cookies, soft drinks and even fruit juices leave deposits on your teeth. Those deposits bond with the bacteria that normally survive in your mouth and form plaque. The combination of deposits and plaque forms acids that can damage the mineral structure of teeth, with tooth decay resulting.

Sensitive Teeth
Your teeth expand and contract in reaction to changes in temperature. Hot and cold food and beverages can cause pain or irritation to people with sensitive teeth. Over time, tooth enamel can be worn down, gums may recede or teeth may develop microscopic cracks, exposing the interior of the tooth and irritating nerve endings. Just breathing cold air can be painful for those with extremely sensitive teeth.

Gum Disease
Gum, or periodontal, disease can cause inflammation, tooth loss and bone damage. Gum disease begins with a sticky film of bacteria called plaque. Gums in the early stage of disease, or gingivitis, can bleed easily and become red and swollen. As the disease progresses to periodontitis, teeth may fall out or need to be removed by a dentist. Gum disease is highly preventable and can usually be avoided by daily brushing and flossing. One indicator of gum disease is consistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth.

Bad Breath (Halitosis)
Daily brushing and flossing helps to prevent the buildup of food particles, plaque and bacteria in your mouth. Food particles left in the mouth deteriorate and cause bad breath. While certain foods, such as garlic or anchovies, may create temporary bad breath, consistent bad breath may be a sign of gum disease or another dental problem.

Canker Sores
Canker sores (aphthous ulcers) are small sores inside the mouth that often recur. Generally lasting one or two weeks, the duration of canker sores can be reduced by the use of antimicrobial mouthwashes or topical agents. The canker sore has a white or gray base surrounded by a red border.

Orthodontic Problems
A bite that does not meet properly (a malocclusion) can be inherited, or some types may be acquired. Some causes of malocclusion include missing or extra teeth, crowded teeth or misaligned jaws. Accidents or developmental issues, such as finger or thumb sucking over an extended period of time, may cause malocclusions.

RAPHAELSON DENTAL ASSOCIATES

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Address

450 Grand Blvd, Deer Park, NY 11729, USA

(631) 667-4080

F(631) 667-4261

©2016 BY RAPHAELSON DENTAL ASSOCIATES.

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